Climate Control: Gender and Racial Bias in Engineering

Research studies indicate that almost 40% of female engineers leave the engineering workforce by midcareer. Implicit or unconscious bias can have a negative impact on the workplace climate, affecting decisions in hiring, promotions, and compensation for women and other underrepresented minorities in engineering, and keeping them from reaching senior-level and leadership positions.

In partnership with the Center for WorkLife Law at the University of California, Hastings College of Law, SWE conducted a study to understand engineers’ experiences with implicit bias in the workplace. Over 3,000 male and female professionals with at least two years of experience as engineers or engineering technicians participated. The results of the study suggest that workplace climate is tougher for women and people of color as compared with white men.

Check out SWE’s webinars and tools to help you address issues of gender and racial bias in the workplace:

  • Diversity & Inclusion Knowledge Cards: Available through the SWE Store
  • Webinar: Give Me the Data: Getting Engineers Talking about Unconscious Bias
  • Webinar: How to Navigate Successfully Through Workplaces Shaped by Subtle Bias